The End of Internet Explorer: What You Need to Know

Over the past year, Microsoft has been moving away from Internet Explorer and has since announced it plans to retire the browser by 2022, a decision which shouldn’t come as a surprise to those familiar with the once beloved web browser. Now pushing 25 years old, Internet Explorer once stood at the forefront of dependable web browsers but has inevitably become notorious for being one of the more slow, buggy, and overall frustrating web browsers on the market today. Keep reading to learn more.

With the age of Internet Explorer coming to end, what does this mean for its users, and what will take its place?

After revealing the news earlier in May, the set end date for Microsoft's use of Internet Explorer is mid-June 2022

After revealing the news earlier in May, the set end date for Microsoft’s use of Internet Explorer is mid-June 2022. While this is definitely the final nail in the coffin for the dated web browser, its end has been in the works for quite some time now.

Living in infamy for its slow and buggy nature, various websites and applications have since ended support for Internet Explorer. Microsoft 365, the company’s subscription-based app bundle, will say its goodbyes to Internet Explorer in August. Even the company’s video-conferencing platform, Microsoft Teams, has already bid its farewells to the web browser, halting support as of last November.

But for those that still hold Internet Explorer close to their heart, what does its eventual demise mean for you?

Microsoft has since announced that the future of Internet Explorer lies with its new browser, Microsoft Edge! While the shift to a different browser is inevitable, previous users of Internet Explorer will be relieved to know that Edge will come equipped with Internet Explorer mode built-in, allowing users continuous access to prior websites and applications found on their older browser.

“Not only is Microsoft Edge a faster, more secure, and more modern browsing experience than Internet Explorer, but it is also able to address a key concern: compatibility for older, legacy websites and applications. Microsoft Edge has Internet Explorer mode (“IE mode”) built-in, so you can access those legacy Internet Explorer-based websites and applications straight from Microsoft Edge. With Microsoft Edge capable of assuming this responsibility and more, the Internet Explorer 11 desktop application will be retired and go out of support on June 15, 2022, for certain versions of Windows 10

Sean Lyndersay

Although Internet Explorer has definitely received its fair share of flak over the years (previously dubbed “the browser you loved to hate”), many forget that it was once the most used web browser of its time. At its height in the early 2000s, Internet Explorer controlled 95% of the browser market. But we’ve come a long way since then!

Currently, Google Chrome now sits as the leading browser, holding a 64% share of the global market, according to browser tracker StatCounter, while the number of Edge users remain at just under 4%.

As time has passed, Internet Explorer has failed to keep up with its competitors, notably due to its sluggish performance, poor security, and buggy web pages. As Internet Explorer continued to falter, users flocked to different browsers like Mozilla’s Firefox and Google’s Chrome – even as early as 2015, users were stating that the end of Internet Explorer was long overdue.

Currently, Google Chrome now sits as the leading browser, holding a 64% share of the global market, according to browser tracker StatCounter, while the number of Edge users remains at just under 4%.


With the end of Internet Explorer in sight, Microsoft has been urging users to make the transition over to its in-house browser, Microsoft Edge. However, if you’re in the need of a new web browser, then it’s always best to do a bit of research on your own end to see which one works best for you!

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